Past Recipients

2017-2018 Winners

The winners for the 2017-18 year are Ms. Brooke MacKenzie of MacKenzie Barristers Professional Corporation in the Fellowship in Studies category and Professor Cristina Toteda of McGill University in the Fellowship in Research category. Ms. MacKenzie will be studying motions for disqualification of counsel on the basis of conflicts of interest. Professor Toteda will develop an immersive one-week module in legal ethics and professionalism for students that will serve as a catalyst towards more practical and experienced-based legal ethics and professionalism in the Canadian context.

2016-2017 Winners

The winners for the 2016-17 year are Mr. Paul Michell of Lax O’Sullivan Lisus Gottlieb LLP in the Fellowship in Studies category and Professor Alain Roussy of the University of Ottawa in the Fellowship in Research category. Mr. Michell will writing on Ethical Consequences of Disaggregation in Legal Practice and Professor Roussy will be conducting research on the History and Adequacy of Rules 3.2-2A and 3.2-2B (Language Rights) of the Rules of Professional Conduct.

2015-2016 Winners

A grant of $5,000 was awarded to Deanne Sowter, an Associate with Birenbaum Steinberg Landau Savin and Colraine LLP, Toronto, recipient of the Chief Justice of Ontario Fellowship in Legal Ethics and Professionalism Studies.  Her project will look at the links between research and practice, as shaped by the academic research and codes that govern ethics and professionalism in family law ADR.

PAPERDeanne M. Sowter, Professionalism and Ethics in Family Law:  The Other 90%

Not Awarded this year – Chief Justice of Ontario Fellowship in Legal Ethics and Professionalism Research

2014-2015 Winners

The 2014-15 OBA Foundation Chief Justice of Ontario Fellowships in Legal Ethics and Professionalism have been awarded to Windsor Law’s Professor Noel Semple (Fellowship in Research) and City of Oshawa staff lawyer Kelly Gravelle (Fellowship in Legal Ethics and Professionalism Studies).  The fellowships promote and fund academic and practical research into the role of lawyers in society.  In the wider community, the work of the fellows fosters principled, evidence-based improvements in lawyers’ service to their clients and constituents.

The 2014-15 Fellow in Research, Prof. Semple, will be engaged in conducting interviews and collecting data on the practical, economic and institutional impediments of private practice lawyers in delivering access to justice for “personal plight” clients.  Semple joined the University of Windsor Faculty of Law after completing a term as Post-Doctorate Fellow and Scholar in Residence at the University of Toronto’s Centre for the Legal Profession.   “Lawyers in private practice are an essential portal between people with legal problems and the just resolutions,” Semple stated in his proposal.  “Is there anything that the legal profession and its regulators can do to increase the accessibility of this segment of the bar?”

Kelly Gravelle’s project as the 2014-15 Fellow in Legal Ethics and Professionalism Studies will examine the often misunderstood role of in-house counsel employed by municipalities and their counterparts in aboriginal communities.  Drawing on her experience in private practice and as staff counsel in municipal and aboriginal law, Gravelle will delve into the unique role of the local government lawyer in balancing public and private interests and obligations, demarcating the boundaries between political and regulatory functions, and ensuring government accountability.

PAPERProfessor Noel Semple, Personal Plight Legal Practice and Tomorrow's Lawyers

PAPERProfessor Noel Semple, Cost of Seeking Civil Justice in Canada

PAPER - Kelly A. Gravelle, The View from the Cheap Seats

2013-2014 Winners

A grant of $15,000 was awarded to Professor Alice Woolley of the University of Calgary, recipient of the Chief Justice of Ontario Fellowship in Legal Ethics and Professionalism Research.   Professor Woolley’s research project will consider the significance of the lawyer’s status as a fiduciary in defining the lawyer’s duties, in particular duties of loyalty and confidentiality.

A grant of $5,000 was awarded to Amy Salyzyn, a graduate student, Yale University Law School, recipient of the Chief Justice of Ontario Fellowship in Legal Ethics and Professionalism Studies.  Her project will study the ethical implications of lawyers’ pre-litigation demand letters.

PAPERProfessor Alice Woolley, The Lawyer as Fiduciary:  Defining Private Law Duties in Public Law Relations

PAPER Amy Salyzyn, Zealous Advoacy or Exploitive Shakedown?  The Ethics of Shoplifting Civil Recovery Letters

2012-2013 Winners

A grant of $15,000 was awarded to Professor Brent Cotter of the University of Saskatchewan and Professors Richard Devlin and Jocelyn Downie of Dalhousie University, recipients of the Chief Justice of Ontario Fellowship in Legal Ethics and Professionalism Research. Their project is “Video Vignettes in Legal Ethics and Professional Responsibility (Confidentiality, Conflicts of Interest, Competence and Quality of Service, Civility and Professionalism and Access to Justice / Pro Bono).”

A grant of $5,000 was awarded to Ms. Hannah Askew, student, Osgoode Hall Law School, recipient of the Chief Justice of Ontario Fellowship in Legal Ethics and Professionalism Studies. Her project is “Educational Strategies to Foster Inter-cultural Understanding of Aboriginal Legal Perspectives among New Legal Professionals.”

PAPERProfessor Brent Cotter, Professor Richard Devlin and Professor Jocelyn Downie, Legal Ethics in Canada An Instructor's Guide

PAPERHannah Askew, Indigenous Legal Traditions and the Challenge of Intercultural Legal Education in Canadian Law Schools