Articles

About Articles The following articles are published by the Labour and Employment Law Section of the Ontario Bar Association. Members are encouraged to submit articles. About Articles

Editor: Madeleine Werker

Today
Today
Three New Job-Protected Leaves Now in Force

Three New Job-Protected Leaves Now in Force

  • November 18, 2014
  • Andrew Reynolds

On October 29, 2014, the Employment Standards Amendment Act (Leaves to Help Families), 2014 (“Bill 21”) came into force. Bill 21 amends the Ontario Employment Standards Act, 2000 to provide for a number of new job-protected leaves.

Labour and Employment Law
State of Whistleblowing Legislation in Canada

State of Whistleblowing Legislation in Canada

  • November 18, 2014
  • Adrian Ishak

In recent years, the lack of accountability and transparency of many public and private organizations has been forcefully brought to the forefront of public attention by the actions of Edward Snowden, Catherine Galliford and numerous others. The actions of these individuals have reignited the discussion over legislative protections for those who disclose the wrongdoings of their employers.

Labour and Employment Law
Provincial Government Passes Legislation to Implement Significant Changes to Ontario’s Workplace Laws

Provincial Government Passes Legislation to Implement Significant Changes to Ontario’s Workplace Laws

  • November 18, 2014
  • Joanna E. Smith

The Stronger Workplaces for a Stronger Economy Act, 2014 (“Bill 18”), was carried after third reading on November 6, 2014. When enacted, the Bill will amend five statutes including the Employment Protections for Foreign Nationals Act (Live-in Caregivers and Others), 2009, the Employment Standards Act, 2000, the Labour Relations Act, 1995, the Occupational Health and Safety Act, and the Workplace Safety and Insurance Act, 1997.

Labour and Employment Law

Mental Stress and the WSIB

  • November 18, 2014
  • Hugh R. Scher and Jeff Childs

Sections 13(4) and 13(5) of the WSIA have always required that claims for mental stress were not covered under the insurance plan unless (1) it was an acute reaction to a sudden and unexpected traumatic event, and (2) it arose in the course of the employee’s employment. However, a recent appeal before the Workplace Safety Insurance Tribunal has thrown this all into question.

Labour and Employment Law